HKICON Conservation Awards 2021

The Hong Kong Institute of Architectural Conservationists (HKICON) announced the winners of the 2021 HKICON Conservation Awards. A jury panel of conservation experts including selected HKICON council members met in late January 2022 to review four submissions spanning two categories—restoration and adaptive reuse. The jury awarded: one Winner in the adaptive reuse category in recognition of their standard-setting restoration and adaptation of an historic building for a new use; one Special Mention in the adaptive reuse category; and one Special Mention in the restoration category in appreciation of their efforts and adherence to standards of best practice in conservation.

award winners

winner
Adaptive Reuse category:

Former French Mission Building, Central

Architectural Conservationist: Raphael Ying, Design 2 (HK) Limited

Team Members: Architectural Services Department; Ptah Heritage Limited; APT Engineering Consultant Limited; Thomas Anderson & Partners Consulting Engineers Limited; Hop Lee Builders Company Limited

special mention

adaptive reuse category:

Central Market, Central

Architectural Conservationists: Lawrence Mak, Urban Renewal Authority; Tony Lam, AGC Design Limited

Team Members: Angie Chung, Central Market; Benjamin Lam, Shadow Design Limited; Chan Yiu Hung, Hong Kong Cultural Imaging Workshop Limited

restoration category:

Island House, Tai Po

Architectural Conservationists: Chui Shing Kit Jack, Purcell Asia Pacific Limited

Team Member: Gary Sparrow, Purcell Asia Pacific Limited

Adaptive Reuse winner

 

Former French Mission Building

Location: 1 Battery Path, Central, Hong Kong

Adaptive reuse of the Former French Mission Building revitalizes one of Hong Kong’s most significant Declared Monuments for use by the Department of Justice, a suitable new use that respects the heritage significance of Government Hill. The project demonstrates standard-setting restoration of the building fabric by removing unsympathetic previous interventions, which enhances authenticity and safeguards the spirit of the place. This is seen especially in the restoration of the former chapel, where the reopening of the oculus and the careful insertion of new services reveal the cultural heritage values of the interiors. The work is underpinned by a detailed conservation management plan and in-depth research, which has delivered a project that is an exemplar of conservation best practice in Hong Kong.

Photo source: ArchSD

Adaptive Reuse special mention

 

Central Market, Central

Location: 80 Des Voeux Road Central, Central, Hong Kong

The revitalization of Central Market gives a new lease of life to one of Hong Kong’s last surviving examples of Modernist architecture. as the project aims to be an inclusive public space with a variety of programs, which rescues the site from a fragile condition following its closure in 2003. This was a challenging project that seeks to reconcile long-term sustainability with the retention of heritage value. The project is appreciated for its efforts to conserve a reinforced concrete building in the sub-tropical climate of Hong Kong, which extends its physical life as well as showcasing solutions for the conservation of similar buildings in Hong Kong. With its ambitious public engagement activities, the project revives a local landmark for Hong Kong reinstating a place of collective memory for public use.

Photo source: AGC & URA

 
Restoration Special Mention

 

Island House, Tai Po

Location: Island House Conservation Studies Centre, 1 Island House Lane, Tai Po, New Territories

The careful restoration of the exterior of Island House reveals the cultural heritage value of a prominent Declared Monument in Hong Kong. The site, including the Main Building and the Servants’ Quarters, suffered from past interventions, such as modern paintwork that masked its character-defining attributes and left the exterior in a deteriorated state. With funding from the HKSAR Government’s Maintenance Scheme, the project adhered to standards of best practice in restoration within a modest budget, setting an example for other heritage buildings in Hong Kong operating under similar constraints.

Photo source: Kevin Mak of 1km Studio

About the winning projects